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Coral Reef Fisheries


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Coral Reef Fisheries


Location: Raja Ampat, Wakatobi, and Nusa Tenggara Barat, Indonesia

Collaborators: Chris Lane (URI); Hawis Madduppa and Luky Adrianto (Bogor Agricultural University); Imam Bachtiar (Universitas Mataram); Wa Iba (Universitas Halu Oleo)

Lab Personnel: Kelvin Gorospe, Paul Carvalho, Melati Kaye, Elaine Shen

Goal: Conduct monitoring on fish catches and reef fish assemblages, as well as market chains, and build social-ecological models testing the effects of different management scenarios such as gear-based restrictions.

Significance: These results will inform decisions intended to move towards ecosystem approaches that consider multiple ecosystem components/scales and social-ecological trade-offs.

Background: Indonesia has the second longest coastline and the largest coral reef area of any country in the world. These reefs support millions of Indonesians by providing ecological, social, and economic goods and services. Although no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) have been widely adopted here, there can be negative impacts on surrounding fisheries, cultural traditions, and social cohesion. Other management strategies such as gear-based restrictions may be effective compliments to MPAs that can be tailored to the local social and ecological context. To properly manage a multi-gear and multi-species coral reef fishery with gear restrictions, however, there must be an understanding of the impacts of different gears and what they mean for reef fish populations and people. 

Funding: US Agency for International Development (USAID), US National Science Foundation (NSF), The Nature Conservancy (TNC)