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Ecosystem Modeling


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Ecosystem Modeling


Location: Narragansett Bay, RI

Collaborators: Jeremy Collie, Candace Oviatt, Emi Uchida, Hiro Uchida, Tracey Dalton (URI); Conor McManus, Jason McNamee (RI Dept of Environmental Management)

Lab Personnel: Lauren Josephs, Kelvin Gorospe, Annie Innes-Gold

Goal: Develop an ecosystem model of Narragansett Bay that integrates foodweb processes with biogeochemical and circulation models as well as human feedbacks and behavior.

Significance: This research will allow us to better understand impacts of anthropogenic stressors by utilizing end-to-end models of the whole ecosystem, thus enabling sustainable social-ecological pathways for estuarine ecosystem-based management.

Background: The need to balance ecological and human wellbeing in the face of global climate change has compelled scientists to work across the natural, physical, and social sciences. Interdisciplinary collaboration is also considered to be essential to the implementation of ecosystem-based management. Ecosystem modeling is a powerful tool for understanding how multiple components interact, feedback to one another, and impact social-ecological trade-offs. Our work will focus on high trophic level species (fish) and people, coupling a foodweb model that includes fisheries and aquaculture species of socioeconomic and ecological importance with a social dynamics model. Utilizing the wide array of long-term datasets from the Bay will enable us to build a data-driven model and evaluate uncertainty and parameter sensitivity.

Funding: US National Science Foundation (NSF)