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Living Shorelines


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Living Shorelines


Living Shorelines

Location: Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Collaborators: US Environmental Protection Agency, Massachusetts Audubon Society (Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary), and Oak Bluffs and Edgartown Shellfish Constables

Goal: Examine the social feasibility of nature-based approaches for salt marsh restoration in a high energy coastal environment.

Significance: The results will allow managers to determine whether this type of approach is socially scalable in addition to being ecologically successful for mitigating coastal erosion and eutrophication.

Background: Coastal ecosystems provide numerous goods and services including nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, and fisheries. Many human activities, however, are degrading coastal habitats. Among the most pervasive drivers of habitat loss along many coastlines has been the armoring of shorelines with bulkheads and similar gray infrastructure. These activities are typically implemented to address concerns of coastal erosion or to achieve socially desirable outcomes (e.g., docking, navigation) across urban, peri-urban, and rural ecotones. Nature-based approaches, which often involve vegetation and shellfish plantings, can be deployed to restore or enhance multiple ecosystem services.