IMG_6885 2.jpg
20160628_099.jpg
Austin_Sabannibnu (39).JPG
IMG_6885 2.jpg

Science for Coastal Sustainability


We are a group of researchers interested in how marine ecosystems and people are interconnected

SCROLL DOWN

Science for Coastal Sustainability


We are a group of researchers interested in how marine ecosystems and people are interconnected

 

Our research

We use a combination of field experiments, observations, and interviews to study the impact of coastal and fisheries management on both nature and people. Our goal is to link ecological interactions with social dynamics to better inform ecosystem-based management.

 
20160628_099.jpg

Working together


Diverse scientists at all career levels, resource-users, managers, and practitioners contribute to our research in creative ways

Working together


Diverse scientists at all career levels, resource-users, managers, and practitioners contribute to our research in creative ways

Our research activities engage multiple stakeholders to provide data for coastal and fisheries policy-makers. We come from all over the world and have a diverse range of experiences and backgrounds. Current projects are located across three different countries and we travel frequently to do fieldwork, collaborate with our partners, and communicate results.

Team members hail from local and national governments, as well as non-governmental organizations such as The Nature Conservancy. We work closely with our partner universities in the places we have ongoing projects, including Pwani University in Kenya, Hassanuddin University in Indonesia, and University of Cape Coast in Ghana.

IMG_9315.jpg
 

Current Research Group Composition

Where are we working?

Austin_Sabannibnu (39).JPG

The Process


Working across different geographies and ecosystems, complex problems motivate us to use mixed-methods

VIEW PROJECTS

The Process


Working across different geographies and ecosystems, complex problems motivate us to use mixed-methods

VIEW PROJECTS

fisheries management

TESTING SOLUTIONS

Marine Protected Areas have been widely adopted as a leading ecosystem-based fisheries management tool in temperate and tropical regions, but there can be negative impacts on cultural traditions, social cohesion, and fisheries. Other management options may include gear-based approaches but data are lacking. 

habitat restoration

DEFINING SUCCESS

Among the most pervasive drivers of habitat loss for ecosystem engineers such as oyster reefs and coral reefs is destructive fishing. Restoration approaches may renew multiple ecosystem services in these habitats, but can restoration positively influence fisheries, food security, and social relationships?

Sustainable Seafood

INTEGRATED SYSTEMS

Seaweed aquaculture is a $6.4 billion global industry but only starting to gain popularity in the US. While kelp and shellfish have been cultivated in integrated systems, success has been highly variable. Better understanding of the environmental factors that maximize productivity is needed, particularly in the Northeast US. 

Screen Shot 2016-10-06 at 10.13.20 AM.jpg
Screen Shot 2016-10-04 at 9.01.22 AM.jpg